Friday, June 9, 2017

JUNE is Alzheimers & Brain Awareness Month!

Don't forget to wear your purple all in the month of June! June is dedicated to Alzheimer's and Brain awareness. Here is the link to a wonderful video I put together for Alzheimer's. My artistic approach. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PQ8tEYQWS8

This morning I was inspired by the Alzheimer's Association.   I am going to put a second video together discussing what I first saw with my grandma. I saw this really awesome video done by the Alzheimer's Association. Check it out on their Facebook page. Here is the link.

They have Samuel L. Jackson in the opening talking about his best friend, his grandpa who was the first in his family to have Alzheimer's.  The next person that got it was his mom. I am so grateful for meeting him just by chance in Honolulu at the Airport.  

He told me his mother passed away from Alzheimer's. I knew right then and their after I told him of my volunteer work that I do with Alzheimer's that my grandma had made that moment for me happen.  Stay tuned! 


#endalz #beverlyjean #purpledignity #remembermyphoto #kickalzintheballz #formygrandma #grandmabev 

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

City of Reno Proclamation: June is Alzheimer & Brain Awareness Month!


Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month
City of Reno, Nevada Proclamation
William! Thank you for your hard work
and dedication to END ALZ!




















Today the Office of the Mayor & The City of Reno, Nevada (my home town) announced the Proclamation for June as Alzheimer’s and Brain awareness month 2017!  The battle for this disease is far from over.  Researchers continue to do their part in finding medications that can help patients that are living with Alzheimer’s.  They are also trying to find a cure.




Left to Right: Bob (A Nevadian Living with Alz) Jacob Harmon,
Regional Director, Northern Nevada Alzheimer's Association.
Brooke Westlake-Kelley (Me)



Please join me. Wear your purple. June is Alzheimer's and Brain Awareness Month!  















And don’t forget JUNE 21st is the longest day. The longest day honors those who are caregivers and those living with Alzheimer’s. My team link is below.
http://act.alz.org/site/TR?fr_id=9704&pg=personal&px=12165563




City of Reno, Proclamation, JUNE Alzheimer's  and
Brian Awareness Month.


Any donation amount is greatly appreciated.Or please consider purchasing one of my Beverly’s Angels magnets, or a pair of Beverly’s Angel Earrings. You can order through my Esty account or message me directly: Photographybmw@yahoo.com


https://www.etsy.com/shop/WestlakeSashCo?ref=profile_shopname




Beverly's Angel Earrings. Petite Pair: $10.00 each

Beverly's Angels Magnets. Purple amethyst stone with a
purple angel on top. $10.00 each.

Friday, June 2, 2017

We MUST Protect Them!

I was court appointed as my grandma's guardian conservator because her third husband was not carrying for her properly, but has also cleared out the "joint" bank account. It is sick what people will do, but re-assured they will get caught. We must protect our elderly and those with Alzheimer's and dementia. I am happy to see that this man was caught.

Reno man guilty in Nevada guardian abuse case sentenced to prison

A 27-year-old Reno man who had been named guardian of his father's affairs has been sentenced to two to 10 years in state prison for looting his family financial accounts.
Nevada state Attorney General Adam Laxalt said Thursday that Yohannes Habtemicael also was ordered to pay $88,000 in restitution.
Habtemicael's attorney, Lee Hotchkin, says there's little chance the money will ever be paid with his client in prison.
He had hoped for a court probation program so Habtemicael could get the charge dismissed after completing restitution.
Habtemicael was appointed by a court in 2014 as guardian of 67-year-old Tewolde Habtemicael's estate.
He pleaded guilty in March to felony exploitation of an older person.
His case is one of several in Nevada involving guardians accused of pilfered money from wards of the court.

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Parents racing to save toddler from 'childhood Alzheimer's'

A Massachusetts couple is in a race against time to save their 13-month-old son from an extremely rare, fatal disease often referred to as “childhood Alzheimer’s.”
Last month, Purnell “Nell” Sabky was diagnosed with the genetic disorder Niemann-Pick Type A, and doctors told his parents that, without intervention, he likely would not live to see his third birthday.
Niemann-Pick Type A is caused by a lack of a specific enzyme, and the disorder prevents the body from metabolizing fat, which leads fat to accumulate around the organs. Patients typically develop an enlarged liver and spleen by 3 months old, and fail to gain weight and grow normally. At around age 1, patients with the disease usually begin to experience a progressive loss of mental abilities and movement, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
“In addition to the complications of his body, he’ll start to grow distant from us,” Sam Sabky, Nell’s father, told Boston 25. “He won’t be able to smile, he won’t be able to laugh, and that’s really the hardest part to deal with.”
With no treatment or cure available, the Sabkys’ doctor told Sam and his wife, Taylor Sabky, that a genetic therapy was on the horizon but that a lack of funding was preventing it from moving forward. They are now racing to raise $750,000 by the end of June with the hopes of treating Nell before his disease progresses much more.
“You think of all the things that your child has ahead of him, and then you hear something like this, and it cuts short all those dreams and wishes,” Taylor told Boston 25. “We want him to have a future, to grow up, to do the small things like saying ‘mama’ and ‘dada,’ to do more long-term things. You think about him getting married, you know, what he’s going to do for a career.”
The money raised will go to the Wylder Nation Foundation, which is working with researchers at the University of California San Francisco’s Bankiewicz Laboratory to make the treatment available to patients, Boston 25 reported. While Nell would be the first patient to enroll in trials, the family is aware of how delicate the timeline is.
“We can dictate this timeline on our terms and try to give him a shot at life,” Sam told Boston 25. “And at the very worst, we can take comfort at the fact that we move the ball forward for maybe the next kid or the kid after that. And that’s a legacy we’d be really proud that Purnell left on the world.”
As of Thursday, the family’s GoFundMe page had received more than $191,000 in donations.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Longest Day-Alzheimer's Fundraiser

I am partaking in the 2017 The Longest Day. Go to my page to make a donation. 
Here is the link

You can also help me raise money for the Longest Day by purchasing either a Beverly's Angel Magnet or Beverly's Angel Earrings. Right now I have 48 magnets ready fly away to new homes. 


To order your Beverly's Angel Magnet, Email me at: Photographybmw@yahoo.com
Magnet inventory listed below.


8-Large purple crystal magnets with large purple angels.  $15.00 each plus shipping

Large Angel Crystal Magnets





10-Purple angel magnets with small silver angels. $10.00 each plus shipping

Small Silver Angel Magnets










20-Purple angel magnets with small purple angels. $10.00 each plus shipping
Small Purple Angel Magnets















7-Purple angel magnets with large purple angels.  $10.00 each plus shipping





To order your Beverly's Angel Magnet, Email me at: Photographybmw@yahoo.com
#BEVERLYJEAN #REMEMBERMYPHOTO #PURPLEDIGNITY #BEVERLYSANGELS #ALZHEIMERS #LONGESTDAY #ENDALZ #FINDACURE 

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Are you looking for a Nevada Support Group?

The Alzheimer's Association offers a number of mutual-self-help support groups for care partners, family members, and loved ones of those with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia. Our support groups encourage members to share information, give and receive mutual support and exchange coping strategies with one another. These support groups create a safe, confidential, supportive environment and a chance for group members to develop informal mutual support and social relationships.

Reno (2)
Men’s Support Group
2nd Tuesday of the Month, 1 – 2 pm
Alzheimer’s Association
1301 Cordone Ave.
Reno, NV 89502
Facilitator: Bob Opp
Contact: 800.272.3900
CARSON CITY
Carson City (2)
4th Wednesday of the Month, 2:30 – 4 pm
Carson City Senior Center
901 Beverly Dr.
Carson City, NV 89706
Facilitator: Alejandra Pulido
Contact: 800.272.3900
CHURCHILL COUNTY
Fallon Support Group
(On-site Respite Provided)
2nd and 4th Wednesday of the Month,
10:30 am – Noon
The Homestead
365 West A Street
Fallon, NV 89406
Facilitator: Candy Foster & Jason Thornton
Contact: 800.272.3900
*Please RSVP if you would like to use respite services.

To sign up for a support group click on the link below.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

The Affects of Alzheimer's and the Millennials.

 I am not sure if I am considered an Millennial. I think I am part of the Y generation; however my story fits perfectly within the context of this article. I know I am not alone. When I reached out to the association to volunteer I began meeting individuals that were in my age bracket.  They had their own Alzheimer's story/experience.   Below is a wonderful article on the facts and figures of the individuals living with Alzheimer's and how it is affecting our Millennial generation.

Brooke


Alzheimer’s Is Affecting Millennials


Americans are living longer and the number of Americans living with, or caring for someone with, Alzheimer’s or a related dementia is growing. As a result, the number of millennials (people under age 35) caring for a parent or grandparent with Alzheimer’s dementia is also growing, and millennials are now estimated to make up 25% of family caregivers in the U.S.
The burden is particularly heavy for millennials whose parents suffer from young-onset Alzheimer’s. Over 200,000 adults have been diagnosed with young-onset Alzheimer’s dementia in the United States. Their children are experiencing now what their peers may not experience for another decade or two: becoming their parent’s caregiver. They may need to stop working or drop out of school, and they are less likely to have information about Alzheimer’s than older caregivers.
On April 24, we teamed up with the American Medical Students Association California State University East Bay Chapter, and U.S. Congressman Eric Swalwell, and invited local millennials to participate in a community forum on the unique needs of young adults who are caring for parents or grandparents with Alzheimer’s or related dementia.
25-year-old Victor Washington from Berkeley is one of those who shared his story. His mother was officially diagnosed in the beginning of 2016 with young-onset Alzheimer’s at the age of 59. During this time, Victor was in his senior year of college, expecting his first-born son, and working part time. With little to no help, he managed to secure Social Security payments for his mother, and became her legal proxy.
In September 2016, he began his first year of graduate school, studying for a Masters in Social Work at Cal State East Bay. He is currently working, going to school, and supporting his mother by paying her bills, preparing her meals, taking her shopping, and keeping track of other various tasks and duties.
Victor says his mother struggles emotionally with her diagnosis and is fearful of the future, and that she often expresses her feelings and concerns to him. She is unwilling to attend support groups because she doesn’t want to leave the house, and doesn’t want anyone but Victor to care for her, so he has struggled to find community resources that can help them.
“I encounter periods of emotional turmoil as I attempt to balance the life of a father, partner, student, intern, employee, and caregiver,” Victor said. “I often worry about my mother’s future once she can no longer live safely by herself, because Medi-Cal and Medicare don’t cover assisted living, and there aren’t enough nursing home beds that take Medi-Cal.”
Listening to Victor was a deeply moving experience for everyone at the forum, and we hope Victor’s story will inspire other millennial caregivers to share their stories with us, too. To share your experience as a millennial caregiver, contact Jessica Rothhaar, Policy and Advocacy Manager, at jrothhaar@alz.org.